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Sustainable practices are a passion for us at TomKat Ranch. Our LeftCoast GrassFed beef product is but one aspect of that. In order to keep informed of the latest research and trends in the sustainable movement, we peruse the web for interesting and informative articles and other information relating to sustainable conservation practices.

Here at the LeftCoast GrassFed blog, we keep you up to date  on what’s going on at LeftCoast GrassFed and TomKat Ranch, and share with you some of what we find the most interesting and important sustainable news.

We hope by doing so we’re helping to change the world.

Our latest post

Recipe Alert: Grilled Liver and Onions

Recipe-Alert

Liver? Blah, right? Well, not so fast. Here’s a recipe from professional chef and friend of ours Chris Hylton over at modernpaleocooking.com

Give it a read, and maybe give it a try. But rest assured, it takes the blah out of the blasé appeal of liver and puts it into go-to recipe contention.


 

Grilled Liver & Onions

Ingredients:

• 1 lb. grass-fed liver
• 1 Whole medium Onion Small Diced (or minced)
• 2 larger cloves of Garlic minced
• 4 small or 2 medium lemons
• 1/2 tsp.Red Chili Flakes
• 1 tsp kosher salt (more if you like)
• 1 TBSP Virgin Coconut Oil – ONLY FOR COOKING (if you are not going to grill)

Combine all ingredients in a bowl and let sit in your refrigerator overnight. Can be frozen, thawed and cooked at a later date.

Cooking instructions:
Range: Heat a nonstick skillet on med high with the coconut oil – once hot “sprinkle” the liver in the pan – do not crowd the pan as you will just end up steaming it and cook it in batches. You want to get some color but don’t overcook it.

Grill: Another way and the more preferable way to cook it is on skewers over the BBQ and this will allow the ends to get all crispy and caramelized but try it in a pan first and again (DO NOT OVER COOK IT!)

The final treat is that when the liver is done, pour the remaining lemon juice and onions into a pan and saute until a little caramelized (about 5-9 minutes) – sometimes you may need to add a little more oil. Service with the livers and enjoy.

Warning: these will have a little of the “distinctive” liver taste but man alive are these tasty and the sweetness of the onions and the sour of the lemons is amaze balls! Enjoy!!!

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Grass-fed Beef Back Ribs

From the Rib

 

Back Ribs are the ribs left over after the rib eye is removed. This tends to leave little meat except between the bones. Makes for a good braising cut, or low-and-slow BBQ  option. Comes in half-rack sizes – approximately 8 ribs, 6 inch length.

Tips & Recipes


 

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Grass-fed Beef Short Ribs

From the Rib

 

Short Ribs are a popular braising cut due to it’s tough, but flavorful meat/fat/bone-in combination. Our ribs are cross-cut or Flanken cut and come in packages of 2 or 4 rib sections with 3 or 4 per package.

The recipes below are a couple of favorites, but to learn more, check out this excellent video from FudeHouse.com: “How to Butcher Short Ribs – where do they come from?”

Tips & Recipes


 

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Grass-fed Prime Rib Roast

From the Rib

 

The Prime Rib Roast, also known as the Standing Rib Roast, is the premier beef roast as it contains several of the more tender muscle groups tucked neatly in a rack of ribs. It’s a special holiday cut offered only during the month of December. Consider ordering one (can contain up to 7 ribs and weigh as much as 6 lbs.) if you want to impress friends and family for the holidays. Consider one pound will server about 2 1/2 people.

The recipes below will help make the most of your Prime Rib. Take special care to cook your roast low and slow and make sure to use that meat thermometer!

Tips & Recipes

There are many recipes online for Prime Rib Roast. Here are links to a wide selection from trusted sources:


 

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Grass-fed Brisket

From the Brisket

 

Brisket is one of those cuts of meat that require special attention. Once considered a lesser cut often left to people on tight budgets and big families, the creative ways in which people have adapted recipes and cooking techniques to overcome its toughness, has made it a special treat often associated with holidays as well as a deli counter favorite.

The recipes below will help make your brisket purchase equally special.

Tips & Recipes


 

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Grass-fed Tri Tip

From the Bottom Sirloin

 

The classic ‘left coast’ roast (discovered to be a great cut for roasting by a grocer in Santa Maria, CA). The Tri Tip Roast is a barbecue favorite. Can also be roasted in the oven. Takes marinade well, but not necessary.

Tips & Recipes


 

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Grass-fed Beef Cross Rib Roast

From the Chuck

 

The Cross Rib Roast is the Chuck Roast’s leaner cousin (not to be confused with Prime Rib Roast). It is likewise easy to prepare and versatile. Suited more for slow, long cooking, or cut up for kabobs, marinated and grilled.

Tips & Recipes


 

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Grass-fed Beef Chuck Roast

From the Chuck

 

The Chuck Roast is one of our most popular roasts and for good reason. Easy to prepare and versatile, the chuck roast a favorite item for winter stews and summer kabobs. Well suited for marinating if using for kabobs, or dry rubbed for roasting, or straight into the pot for pot roast.

Tips & Recipes


 

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Grass-fed Top Sirloin

From the Top Sirloin

 

The Top Sirloin is a classic steak. Fairly lean, well-priced, and best if marinated overnight. Once marinated, it can be grilled, pan seared, or broiled and is best served rare to medium rare are most.

Tips & Recipes

  • If straight from the package and room temperature, grill it low and slow.
  • If pan-searing, sear one side for about a minute, flip, then place it in a 200 degree oven for 5 – 8 minutes while the second side is searing to finish it.
  • FoodNetwork.com: Grass-fed Sirloin Steak with Spinich

 

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Grass-fed Rib Steak

From the Rib

 

Like the Rib Eye Steak, the Rib Steak is cut from the front ribs in front of the sirloin. Called a Rib Steak because the meat is left on the rib bone. This adds a layer of complexity to an already complex steak.

Noted for it’s complex flavors resulting from multiple muscle groups and marbling. Can be grilled, pan seared, or broiled and is best served rare to medium rare at most to appreciate the flavors. The bone-in nature of the steak, however requires special attention to cooking temperatures near the bone. This area will be the last to cook through as the bone acts to insulate the meat from the heat.

 Recipes & tips


 

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